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Why I’m Taking a Small Break From The Blog

You may have noticed that I haven’t been posting to the blog as often lately. There is a good reason for this, and I want to share it with you, since you all have been such wonderfully loyal and engaged readers.

I launched the Social Velocity blog in September of 2008, nine years ago this month. I started writing these blog posts (largely to myself and a few friends and family) as a catharsis. I was often frustrated by dysfunctions I saw in the nonprofit and philanthropic sectors, and I felt a burning desire to call a spade a spade. Over time, to my immense surprise and delight, my audience grew. A few years in, I began to create some regular series — Financing Not Fundraising, 10 Great Social Innovation Reads, the SV Interview Series — and am lucky enough to host several amazing guest bloggers. And thus the blog became a very regular part of my life.

But I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how we are, in our modern lives, so completely driven by the to do list that we rarely (if ever) take a big step back and ask what it’s all about. I have found myself in recent months needing to distance myself from the endless to do list and carve out some space for bigger, deeper thinking, writing, exploring. I have begun feeling a real need to find more quiet so that I can listen more intently to what I’m supposed to be doing.

At the same time, the 2016 election and the subsequent relentless blow after punishing blow against the progressive causes I have spent my life championing has really thrown me for a loop, as I know it has many of you. I’m feeling a desire to figure out a bigger role for myself in the social change arena, to figure out how I can, as Darren Walker put it, “take up the mantle and choose to lead.” Because I truly believe that now, more than ever, we are all called to play a bigger role in the social change we seek.

But figuring that out takes time for thinking, analyzing, scheming. And it’s hard for me to carve out that space when I’ve got a blog publishing schedule breathing down my neck.

The constant drum of the blog deadline (I try to publish most Tuesdays and Thursdays) has become a bit of a burden. Rather than always writing because my heart required it, I began writing because the calendar required it. Instead of being a joy, the blog began to feel stale and punishing to me. Add to that the many other things I have been working on (my consulting practice, book ideas, other projects), and I have begun to realize that I need space to think bigger about what my voice in the social sector should be. I am, it seems, finally taking my own advice to “find the value in quiet.”

And don’t think that I have made this decision lightly. It terrifies me to walk away, even briefly, from something I love doing and a readership I am so fond of. But sometimes you have to do the thing that scares you most.

While I so appreciate you, my loyal readers, and your emails, comments, Tweets and support, I need to take a bit of a step back and find some space to figure out what is next for the blog. Rest assured, I have no visions of ending the blog. I know that if I give up my outlet for the things I need to say, I will probably explode. But I do need some space to reinvent the blog.

So I may not write as often for awhile. Or I may write soon on new and different topics. I don’t have a timeline for when I’ll write again. I just know that I will. It might be tomorrow, it might be next week, it might be in 3 months.

I hope that when I figure it out, you will join me again. So stay tuned!

Photo Credit: Richard Revel

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When Humor Overcomes Hate

If the news (fake or otherwise) is getting you down lately, you need look no further than my fair city of Austin, Texas to restore your faith in humanity.

Austin is a quirky mix of conservatives to the North and progressives to the South and somehow we all (for the most part) get along. Last week our Mayor, Steve Adler, gave a pitch perfect reaction to some of the vitriol and divisiveness that is increasingly prevalent across the country.

A local movie chain, The Alamo Drafthouse, reserved a few screenings of the new Wonder Woman movie for women only and it caused a backlash among some men. One particularly irate man sent a hate-filled email to the Mayor asking him to intervene. The man’s email read, in part:

I hope every man will boycott Austin and do what he can to diminish Austin and to cause damage to the city’s image. The theater that pandered to the sexism typical of women will, I hope, regret it’s decision. The notion of a woman hero is a fine example of women’s eagerness to accept the appearance of achievement without actual achievement. Women learn from an early age to value make-up, that it’s OK to pretend that you are greater than you actually are. Women pretend they do not know that only men serve in combat because they are content to have an easier ride. Women gladly accept gold medals at the Olympics for coming in 10th and competing only against the second class of athletes. Name something invented by a woman!

However, instead of taking the easy path and berating the man, the Mayor instead wrote a funny, hopefully anger-reducing response:

Dear Mr. Ameduri,

I am writing to alert you that your email account has been hacked by an unfortunate and unusually hostile individual. Please remedy your account’s security right away, lest this person’s uninformed and sexist rantings give you a bad name. After all, we men have to look out for each other!

Can you imagine if someone thought that you didn’t know women could serve in our combat units now without exclusion? What if someone thought you didn’t know that women invented medical syringes, life rafts, fire escapes, central and solar heating, a war-time communications system for radio-controlling torpedoes that laid the technological foundations for everything from Wi-Fi to GPS, and beer? And I hesitate to imagine how embarrassed you’d be if someone thought you were upset that a private business was realizing a business opportunity by reserving one screening this weekend for women to see a superhero movie.

You and I are serious men of substance with little time for the delicate sensitivities displayed by the pitiful creature who maligned your good name and sterling character by writing that abysmal email. I trust the news that your email account has been hacked does not cause you undue alarm and wish you well in securing your account. And in the future, should your travels take you to Austin, please know that everyone is welcome here, even people like those who wrote that email whose views are an embarrassment to modernity, decency, and common sense.

Yours sincerely,
Steve Adler

These are tense, divisive times where technology has made it easier for us to sometimes let our darker natures surface. I am hopeful that we are cresting the wave of anger and polarization, and are beginning to return to a place of reason where we all acknowledge that we are different, but fundamentally the same.

Photo Credit: Erika Wittlieb

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10 Great Social Innovation Reads: May 2017

May was another fascinating month in the world of social change. There are some interesting shifts happening among the institutions and movements working to improve black lives, new polls point to a surging American liberalism (not conservatism), the suburbs are no longer the route to the American dream, anti-hunger efforts may actually be perpetuating the problem, and a librarian who questioned the impact of Little Free Libraries received quite a backlash.

Below are my picks of the 10 best social change reads in May. But feel free to add to the list in the comments. And you can see a longer list by following me on Twitter @nedgington.

You can also see 10 Great Reads lists from past months here.

  1. The first 100 days of Trump’s presidency have been exhausting for the country. The Chronicle of Philanthropy offered some questions for philanthropist to think about after those first 100 days. And Trump’s budget recommendations, if adopted by Congress, could have pretty damaging effects on the nonprofit sector and the foundations that fund them.

  2. A more specific impact \ that the Trump Administration could have on the nonprofit sector would be to eliminate the Johnson Amendment. The 60 year old Amendment has prohibited churches and nonprofit organizations from any political campaigning. Robert Egger, founder and president of L.A. Kitchen and Vikki Spruill, president and CEO of the Council on Foundations, debated whether the repeal of the amendment would be a good or bad thing for the sector.

  3. Despite the fact that state and federal government is being led largely by Republicans right now, it looks like American populism may have a liberal, as opposed to conservative, bent according to some new polls. Ruy Teixeira from Vox analyzed recent poll data and argued that America is actually witnessing a liberal surge:  “Trump in the White House and the Republicans in control of Congress and most states…owes much more to the peculiar nature of the Electoral College, gerrymandering, structural GOP advantages in Congress, and poor Democratic strategy than to the actual views of the American public.”

  4. And that populism that is sweeping the country is beginning to target philanthropy. David Callahan argued that the underlying elitism of philanthropy must be laid bare: “America is in the midst of an epic backlash against elites, one that’s put a reality TV maestro in the White House. So far, philanthropy has been insulated from this broader convulsion, but there are good reasons for the sector to engage in its own introspection about elite power…There’s not yet much discussion about the bigger question regarding how much sway private philanthropy—and a growing class of savvy “super-citizens”—should have over public life in a democratic society like ours.” And Kristin A. Goss and Jeffrey M. Berry argued on the HistPhil blog that the populist surge is posing at least 3 challenges to foundations.

  5. There is something interesting happening in the efforts to improve the lives of African Americans. The NAACP fired its president Cornell William Brooks after only 3-years in the hopes that the organization could become more responsive to changing external circumstances. But Cyndi Suarez wondered whether this 100+ year old institution can adapt to and engage with growing social movements like Black Lives Matter.  And earlier in the month she described how BLM itself is evolving amid changing times.

  6. Jay A. Winsten from the Harvard Chan School of Public Health described how a national media strategy, even in today’s very fractured media environment, can move social change forward.

  7. Some new data in May showed giving differences between genders and generations, and the  Master of Public Administration program at the University of San Francisco created a nice infographic on The Current and Future State of Philanthropy.

  8. Something really interesting happened when a Toronto librarian questioned the claim that Little Free Libraries, the small birdhouse-like boxes of free books cropping up in neighborhoods around the country, are actually increasing literacy. People got really mad.

  9. Writing in CityLab, Richard Florida painted a pretty bleak picture of how the suburbs, once the destination for the growing middle class, are now crumbling: “Suburban growth has fallen out of sync with the demands of the urbanized knowledge economy. Too much of our precious national productive capacity and wealth is being squandered on building and maintaining suburban homes with three-car garages, and on the infrastructure that supports them, rather than being invested in the knowledge, technology, and density that are required for sustainable growth. The suburbs aren’t going away, but they are no longer the apotheosis of the American Dream and the engine of economic growth.”

  10. Finally, there’s a new book to add to your reading list: Andy Fisher’s Big Hunger: The Unholy Alliance between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups. Fisher argues that anti-hunger nonprofits are perpetuating the underlying wealth inequality that causes hunger by aligning with corporations that are exacerbating poverty through low wages and job cuts.

Photo Credit: kyle rw

 

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10 Great Social Innovation Reads: January 2017

In January it seemed as though we moved into social change hyper drive.

With the inauguration of a new president, a litany of controversial executive orders, numerous efforts to block or minimize them, and advice for or frustration with the nonprofit and philanthropic sectors’ responses, the world of social change moved at warp speed.

Add to that lots of predictions and advice for the nonprofit sector, and some small, but inspiring efforts to feed and comfort those in need and January was a very busy month.

Below are my picks of the 10 best reads in January, but feel free to add to the list in the comments. If you want a longer list, follow me on Twitter @nedgington, and if you want to see past months’ lists go here.

  1. Some still struggled to understand the 2016 election. Continuing his 4-year series on the smaller cities of America for The Atlantic, James Fallows argued that while Americans distrust national policy and institutions they still have faith in local government: “City by city, and at the level of politics where people’s judgments are based on direct observation rather than media-fueled fear, Americans still trust democratic processes and observe long-respected norms.”  And Eytan Oren offered some insight into how social media and major technology companies took civic engagement to a new level in the 2016 election.

  2. A few days before Trump was inaugurated, President Obama gave a farewell speech that focused on the need for greater civic engagement, and he and Michelle Obama launched a new foundation to help deliver on those ideas. And Pew Research crunched the numbers on how America changed over his 8-year term.

  3. Quite quickly after his inauguration, President Trump signed several executive orders, and a “resistance” movement that is rather unprecedented in U.S. history mobilized in response.   thing the resistance movement has going for it is their savvy use of social networks.

  4. In particular, Trump’s executive order banning immigration from 7 Muslim-majority countries created some soul-searching in the philanthropic sector. Inside Philanthropy‘s David Callahan expressed frustration about a seeming silence among philanthropic leaders on Trump’s immigration ban, asking “What’s the point of being in charge of society’s risk capital if you don’t take risks at a moment like this?” But 50 philanthropic leaders signed a strong statement against the ban.

  5. Amid all of the uproar surrounding the immigration ban, there was light in small places. A group of people from New Jersey launched a supper club that creates community among and raises money for Syrian refugees.

  6. Because January started a new year, there were the usual posts predicting what the new year will bring for philanthropy and nonprofits.

  7. But this year was different because several writers argued that the nonprofit sector needs to move more strongly into advocacy. And there was lots of other advice about how nonprofits should approach the Trump era, from building resilience, to messaging more effectively in a “post-truth” world, to making America “good” again, to answering 12 “Ifs”.

  8. A rather more sweeping bit of advice for the social change sector came from Pablo Eisenberg who argued that the organization Independent Sector should no longer be an association of both nonprofits and foundations, but just nonprofits. The HistPhil blog asked him to elaborate on the history of that important institution.  

  9. BoardSource, GuideStar, BBB Wise Giving Alliance, and the Association of Fundraising Professionals partnered to release a new method for evaluating a nonprofit’s fundraising effectiveness. The method looks at three metrics in a nonprofit organization: the fundraising net revenue, the cost of fundraising, and the dependency quotient (the percent of the budget funded by the nonprofit’s top 5 donors). Because let’s remember, as Rick Moyers pointed out, Development Directors Are Not Miracle Workers.

  10. Finally, a tangent into something small and really cool. The idea of little free libraries that have been cropping up on people’s front lawns has gone in a new direction. Mini food pantries have started helping neighbors in need.

Photo Credit: Jens Schott Knudsen

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Speak Out and Be Counted

I had an ache in the pit of my stomach all weekend long. I get a stomach ache whenever something is very, very wrong. Friday’s Executive Order banning immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries is so very wrong, and so fundamentally un-American.

I am an American because my ancestors at one point or another immigrated to this country because they thought it would offer better opportunities and/or more tolerance. And I have spent my career working in and with the nonprofit sector, which is fundamentally about giving voice and support to the oppressed.

For these reasons (and so many more) this executive order is completely anathema to me.

By yesterday my stomach was aching for some sort of salve. So here’s what I did:

  • I called my members of Congress — both of my Senators and my Representative, at both their D.C. and local offices to ask them to stand up against this immigration ban. And I will continue to do so every day. Several of their voicemail boxes were already full, so I took some comfort in the fact that others are as upset as I am. But I will not rest on that knowledge, I’ll keep trying to leave my own message.

  • I donated to the ACLU, who by the way, received $24 million in online donations from 350,000 people over the weekend (six times their normal annual online donations!). So again, there is comfort in numbers.

  • I emailed a message of solidarity to my client, the Muslim Public Affairs Council, which is an amazing group working tirelessly (and much harder these days) for the civil rights of American Muslims.

  • I’m continuing to follow resistance hashtags on Twitter like the 80+ alternative Twitter handles for the various government agencies that are no longer allowed to Tweet information at odds with the administration, and the #ThisIsYourLand and #Resistance hashtags, as well as the growing social movement of protest and resistance.

  • I will continue to work to encourage the nonprofit sector — the moral compass of this great country — to be bold and speak out against anything that goes against the fundamental values of our country.

As Charles Blow wrote yesterday in the New York Times:

“America will not stand for this, so if obsequious conservative politicians or lily-livered liberal ones won’t sufficiently stand up to this demagogic dictator, then the American people will do the job themselves. Over the weekend, protesters spontaneously popped up at airports across the country to send an unambiguous message: Not in our name; not on our watch. It is my great hope that this will be a permanent motif of Trump’s term. If no one else is going to fight for American values, it falls to the American people themselves to do so.”

Yes, that is right. As Americans, we’ve been training for this since we had our first civics lesson back in middle school.

And as social change leaders, we all have an obligation to speak up.  As Greg Oliphant put it “There are truths that need to be spoken now, spoken out loud and unapologetically by people who know them to be true. Spoken with love, yes, but also fierce conviction…They are where we as a sector…must find our voice, in holding them out not as criticism but as the True North we still must point towards, the star we still see and hold steady in our gaze despite attempts to obscure it.”

If you too felt sickened by the events of this past weekend, get engaged — speak out and be counted. Do not sit back and wait for someone else to do it.

Not in our name. Not on our watch.

Photo Credit: Miraage.clicks

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Will the Women’s March Usher In a New Era of Civic Engagement?

Perhaps like many of you, I participated in the Women’s March on Saturday. In my hometown of Austin, Texas I stood with my husband and two teenage sons amid a sea of 50,000 other people, and I suddenly wondered whether we are witnessing the birth of a new era of civic engagement.

Saturday was to me an amazing and previously unseen (in my lifetime) display of citizen participation. Whatever your political views, when 2 million+ people take to the streets in a single day, you have to admit that something is going on.

As one of my East-coast based colleagues said in an email on Saturday morning:

“I’m on a bus to DC this morning with my wife and daughter.  The excitement is palpable  on the I-95 corridor as thousands of buses are lined up to enter the Capital. The buses are filled with patriots, patriots with a lovers quarrel with their country.  It should be an exhilarating day for the promise of America.”

And as I looked around at the thousands and thousands of smiling faces around me on Saturday, I too felt my patriotism swell. It was perhaps the beginning of a more inclusive and engaging democracy — Americans re-entering the public sphere. (Although some argue that if this movement doesn’t connect to larger institutions — like the political parties — it won’t actually result in social change).

It is too soon to tell where this will take us. It could be that the nonprofit sector will be called to lead this movement. Indeed, many of the speakers across the country on Saturday urged people to join and support nonprofit organizations. And many new organizations are cropping up amid this new energy, while, as I’ve mentioned before, many nonprofit organizations have seen donations soar since the election.

As Josh Marshall wrote last week, these times demand something much more from us — something more than any of us have ever been asked to give. And we must rise to the challenge:

“We know the curse: may you live in interesting times. We are living in interesting times. Most of us would not have chosen it. But we have it. I think many of us look back at critical momentous moments in our history, the Civil War, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement and other comparable passages in the country’s history and think, what would I have done? Where would I have been? Well, now’s your moment to find out. We are living in interesting times. We should embrace it rather than feel afraid or powerless. We have a fabric of 240 years of republican government behind us. We have the tools we need. This isn’t naiveté. It’s not any willful looking away from anything that is before us. It’s being ready. It is embracing the challenge of the moment rather than cowering. It’s having some excitement and gratitude for living in a moment when a new and potent challenge to preserving who we are has fallen to us.”

So while I spent much of November and December full of dread about what the future may bring, I now have a burgeoning sense of hope. Perhaps our democracy isn’t crumbling. Maybe instead we are being asked, each one of us, to remake it stronger, more inclusive and more energetic than ever before.

These are certainly interesting times.

Photo Credit: National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Gagnon

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10 Great Social Innovation Reads: Oct 2016

social change readingOctober was a bit of a whirlwind in the world of social change. Continued concerns that philanthropy is not positioned to truly impact wealth inequality, a confusing pivot by Charity Navigator in the Overhead Myth movement, some case studies of networked approaches to social change, and a great blog series on nonprofit financial health all made for some interesting reads.

Below is my pick of the top 10 social change reads in October. But, please add what I missed in the comments.

And if you want a longer list, follow me on Twitter @nedgington. You can also read past 10 Great Reads lists here.

  1. There seems to be a growing discussion around whether philanthropy, which results from wealth inequality, can actually be effective at remedying that inequality. Writing on the openDemocracy blog, Michael Edwards takes the Ford Foundation and other foundations working on wealth inequality to task for not seeking to reform the underlying systems that feed that inequality. As he puts it, “Imagine what would happen if we re-configured the supply of money for social change…It would mean the wholesale transformation of institutional philanthropy, since for Ford and others like it an assault on privilege is essentially an assault upon themselves.” And in an interesting and related development, this month head of the Ford Foundation Darren Walker joined the corporate board of Pepsico, which some argue contributes to the obesity epidemic and ultimately economic inequality. But David Callahan argues that Walker could serve as a positive force to push Pepsico to “do better.”

  2. For only the second time in its 26 years The Chronicle of Philanthropy‘s annual Philanthropy 400 list ranks a nonprofit other than the United Way Worldwide as the biggest fundraiser. This year Fidelity Charitable, which houses donor advised funds, took the #1 spot. And some think this is a bellwether for philanthropy. But Jim Schaffer has some issues with the list and how it ignores the deeper complexities of philanthropy.

  3. If you are looking for data about where the social sector is going, this month provided lots of it. From Fidelity Charitable’s report on the future of philanthropy, to a new study from the Alliance for Nonprofit Management on nonprofit board chairs, to new data from the Urban Institute on the nonprofit workforce.

  4. In a head-scratching move, Charity Navigator, one of the proponents of the campaign to overcome the Overhead Myth wrote a blog post arguing that nonprofits that keep their overhead percentage to 15% or less are “excellent.” Many, took them to task.

  5. On the eve of the presidential election, Kiersten Marek from Inside Philanthropy offers some predictions about how philanthropy focused on women’s and children’s issues might fare under a Clinton presidency.

  6. In what has become an incessant drumbeat, ProPublica again criticizes the American Red Cross, this time for a botched response to the Louisiana flooding this summer.

  7. As I mentioned earlier, I’m a huge fan of Twitter, but it’s struggling. NPR tech writer Laura Sydell wonders if becoming a nonprofit might be the answer for this social network that is playing a growing role in social change efforts.

  8. Using networks for social change is a hot topic lately. Talia Milgrom-Elcott provides a case study for a networked approach to growing STEM education, and R. Patrick Bixler, Clare Zutz, and Ashley Lovell provide a case study on using networks for regional conservation. But Jake Hayman, writing in Forbes argues that philanthropy actually dis-incentivizes nonprofits to pursue a networked approach.

  9. In a not-to-be-missed blog series, the Nonprofit Finance Fund provides a great tutorial on “Best Practices for Nonprofit Financial Health” (part one, part two, and part three).

  10. And if you wonder why you are here and what your role is, look no further than Steven Pressfield who writes: “I believe that life exists on at least two levels. The lower level is the material plane…The higher level is the home of…the Muse. The higher level is a lot smarter than the lower level. The higher level understands in a far, far deeper way. It understands who we are. It understands why we are here. It understands the past and the future and our roles within both. My job, as I understand it, is to make myself open to this higher level. My job is to keep myself alert and receptive. My job is to be ready, in the fullest professional sense, when the alarm bell goes off and I have to slide down the pole and jump into the fire engine.”

Photo Credit: Peter Griffin

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A Monster List of Social Changemakers on Twitter

social change monster listToday is Halloween, which means it’s time for another monster list. In keeping with my Halloween tradition on the blog, today I’d like to add to past monster lists (of social change blogs, conferences, books, and resources) with a monster list of social changemakers to follow on Twitter.

I know, I know, Twitter is struggling.  Maybe it will never become the profit powerhouse that Facebook is, but Twitter has become a unique and powerful social change tool, through hashtag movements like #BlackLivesMatter and #ArabSpring and its ability to connect like-minded people.

In my mind, Twitter is infinitely more thought-provoking and gamechanging than other social networks. So I hope it finds its way and continues to play an important role in the social change space.

Below is my monster list (in no particular order) of interesting social change people to follow on Twitter. These are people who have fascinating things to say about the world of social change. They are nonprofit, philanthropic, government leaders; journalists; thought leaders and more who use Twitter as a way to spark conversation, spread ideas and make social change a reality.

I have let them describe themselves via their Twitter “Bio”:

  • @knightfdn The Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts.
  • @pndblog Opinion and commentary on the changing world of philanthropy. Brought to you by Philanthropy News Digest and the Foundation Center.
  • @vppartners Venture Philanthropy Partners brings people together to support children and youth.
  • @RockefellerFdn The Rockefeller Foundation’s mission—unchanged since 1913—is to improve the well-being of humanity throughout the world.
  • @carolinefiennes Director of Giving Evidence: encouraging /enabling charitable *giving* based on sound *evidence*. Wrote acclaimed book, It Ain’t What You Give. FT columnist.
  • @ClaraGMiller President, F. B. Heron Foundation
  • @MarketsForGood #Information to drive #socimp. Movement seeking ways to increase the social sector’s capacity to generate, share & use #data to improve decision making.
  • @Cingib Strategist/writer for foundations/NPs on civic engagement, capacity-building, democracy, philanthropy, nonprofit sector, and education
  • @kanter Let’s talk about networks, data, self-care, & social media for nonprofit learning & impact. #nptech Instructional designer, trainer, walker, & magic markers!
  • @ajscholz Chief Everything Officer @SphaeraInc / Learning to collaborate to survive the 21st century / We now have the technological, legal and financial tools for it!
  • @Philanthropy News, resources, advice, and commentary about the nonprofit world from The Chronicle of Philanthropy.
  • @KateSBarr Believes that working at & leading nonprofits calls upon the best in people. Executive director at @NAFund
  • @NTENorg Serving our members in the nonprofit community to better use technology to further their mission. We promote nonprofit tech (#nptech) & training (#NTENlearn).
  • @Daniel_Stid Skeptical optimist, Madisonian, partisan of representative democracy, fan of Sparty and the Flying Dutchmen.
  • @IUPhilanthropy Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy offers a comprehensive approach to philanthropy—Improving Philanthropy to Improve the World.
  •  President/CEO of Grantmakers for Effective Organizations. Committed to helping our sector exceed expectations.
  •  Director for Effective Philanthropy at the Hewlett Foundation.
  •  Phil Buchanan is president of the Center for Effective Philanthropy.
  • @CEPData The Center for Effective Philanthropy focuses on the development of comparative data to enable higher-performing funders.
  •  BUILD Director at the Ford Foundation. Passionate about the social sector, addressing inequality in all its forms, & Jane Austen.
  •  We make millions of dollars in loans to nonprofits and push for fundamental improvement in how money is given and used in the sector.
  •  The National Council of Nonprofits is a trusted resource and advocate for America’s charitable nonprofits.
  • Crusader for at in and beyond. Especially fond of rhymes.
  • @PackardOE We’re the Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Team. We’re here to share and learn about organizational effectiveness, philanthropy and supporting the social sector.
  •  Founder of /. Now leading to further reveal the power of food, community & social enterprise. No Waste!! Opinions are mine.
  •  Reporter at The Chronicle of Philanthropy ~ I cover nonprofit innovation, social enterprise, data, and technology. (I am so not the political pundit.)

I know I have missed many thought-provoking social changemakers. So, who would you add to the list?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

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