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10 Great Social Innovation Reads: June & July 2017

Since I was on vacation (and off social media) for a chunk of June, I decided to combine the June and July 10 Great Reads lists into one.

But that proved to be a tricky feat, since there was no shortage of activity in the world of social change during those two months. From the U.S. leaving the Paris Climate Accord and cities stepping up in its wake, to a new book from philanthropy expert David Callahan, to a new approach to the healthcare debate, to ways nonprofits are using artificial intelligence for good, it was a busy couple of months. In my (limited) view, these were the 10 best reads in the world of social change in June and July.

But I am quite sure that I missed some great stuff during those months, so feel free to add to the list in the comments.

And if you want to see past months’ 10 Great Reads lists, go here.

  1. President Trump announced in June that the U.S. would leave the Paris Climate Agreement, making us one of only three countries in the world that are not participating. Lest you think there’s nothing to worry about, check out this interactive map that projects how hot your city could be by 2100. But governors, mayors, and business and nonprofit leaders across the country defiantly stepped up to outline how they would fight climate change without the federal government.  Even on an individual level, there are things you can do to combat climate change, says a new study. And Tate Williams argued that philanthropy must now step up to fund a comprehensive social movement to combat climate change.

  2. Speaking of philanthropy funding social movements, Kate Kroeger from the Urgent Action Fund for Women’s Human Rights explained how funders can support civic action in our current political environment,  and the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy put out a call to social movement leaders for ideas on how to do just that.

  3. As Republicans in Congress continued to struggle to function as a party, some took a look at what’s going on with the Democratic party. Caroline Levine wondered if the Democratic party can change enough to effectively engage Millennials. And Lee Drutman argued that the Democrats are suffering from an inability to engage organizers at the local level.

  4. The biggest example of our Congressional leaders struggling to lead may be their inability to fix healthcare, but Malcolm Gladwell suggested a new way to reframe the conversation that could move it forward.

  5. As the Internet of Things, the increasing online connectedness of everyday things, continues to grow, Pew Research explored what the implications are. But at the same time, good old fashioned libraries are being increasingly used, particularly by Millennials.

  6. Artificial intelligence can be a scary, new thing, but nonprofits (not Silicon Valley) are actually leading the pack in developing some pretty socially positive things with it. And Beth Kanter offered some ideas for how nonprofits can use bots to advance their missions.

  7. Lucy Bernholz discussed the importance of a new report from Betterplace Labs that describes how Germany has used technology to integrate 1 million+ refugees. For Lucy, this report is a critical read because we all are, or will, face population displacements, and we must learn how to become resilient together: “This prospect – welcoming, receiving, moving forward together – is our collective future. Lessons learned now, about the politics, social challenges, technological realities of building welcoming and resilient diverse communities is information we can all use.”

  8. David Callahan released a new book, The Givers: Wealth, Power, and Philanthropy in a New Gilded Age, which charts the growth over the past two decades in the number and scale of mega philanthropists. He argues they have a new kind of influence on public goods and public policy, perhaps to the detriment of broader, more inclusive civic engagement.  His book found some criticism, which Callahan himself answered.

  9. But at the same time, some like Cathy Cha from the Haas Fund, would argue that we are witnessing a dramatic increase in civic engagement. As she wrote: “At a time when so much is on the line, people are stepping out of their comfort zones and becoming more involved in our democracy. We are marching, participating in spur-of-the-moment protests, volunteering, giving money, and contacting our elected representatives — all in unprecedented numbers, and all in an effort to show we’re paying attention and we care.”

  10. A day before the big announcement that Amazon was taking over grocery giant Wholefoods, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced he was getting into the philanthropy game with a Tweet asking for advice about how to make a difference “right now.” His focus on the short-term, irked many (manymany) philanthropic thought leaders who argued that he should focus on long-term social change. But philanthropic historian, Benjamin Soskis argued that direct charity (like cash transfers to the poor) is actually seeing a resurgence and perhaps for good reason.

Photo Credit: perzon seo

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10 Great Social Innovation Reads: September 2015

social changeIn September there was some surprising good news about climate change. Yes, you read that right. We are perhaps, slowly, starting to address that problem (mind blowing, huh?). And in other news, there was a call for funders to help nonprofits become better fundraisers and some tools to help nonprofits use data in that pursuit.

Add to that concern about what digitial technology is doing to our humanness and critiques of Teach for America, proposed changes to philanthropy policy and an emerging “network” entrepreneur, and it was a very interesting month.

Below are my picks of the 10 best reads in the world of social change in September. But let me know what I missed. And if you want a longer list, follow me on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or Google+.

And if you want to see past 10 Great Reads lists go here.

  1. If the world of social change is getting you down, if the challenges we face seem insurmountable, look no further than the New York Magazine where Jonathan Chait sees hope in the battle against climate change. As he puts it: “The willpower and innovation that have begun to work in tandem can continue to churn. Eventually the world will wean itself almost completely off carbon-based energy. There is, suddenly, hope.” Wow.

  2. Writing on the Blue Avocado blog, Aaron Dorfman from The National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy takes foundations to task for wanting their grantees to be financially sustainable, but not helping them build that capacity, “Why don’t more foundations invest in helping their organizing grantees develop independent funding streams? Here – as with many issues grantees face – even a little targeted capacity-building support would go a long way.” Yes, yes, a thousand times yes!

  3. One of the ways nonprofits can build fundraising capacity is by learning to use their data more effectively to raise money. To help in that effort, The Chronicle of Philanthropy put together a helpful toolkit of articles and case studies.

  4. And speaking of fundraising, the ALS Foundation continues to amaze me. In September, they released a nice infographic to the many donors of the 2014 Ice Bucket challenge reporting where their $115 million in donations went. Great donor stewardship and transparency!

  5. There seems to be a growing concern about what technology is doing to our humanness. Callie Oettinger writes “While social media has made sharing easier, allowing us to connect with the rest of the world, I often think about what would happen if people stopped trying to connect with the rest of the world and instead spent their time 1) creating value and 2) sharing value, rather than…creating crap and sharing crap.” And MIT professor Sherry Turkle released a new book, Reclaiming Conversation that argues we must “acknowledge the unintended consequences of the technologies to which we are vulnerable [and] make corrections and remember who we are — creatures of history, of deep psychology, of complex relationships, of conversations, artless, risky and face to face.”

  6. A new series launched at The Washington Post about the newest buzz phrase in the world of philanthropy, “effective altruism.” This is the idea that you should “optimize your donations to ensure that they are as “high-impact” as possible.” It is a fascinating and controversial idea.

  7. To counter the hype about “social entrepreneurs,” Jane Wei-Skillern (who wrote one of my favorite articles ever about networked nonprofits), David Ehrlichman, and David Sawyer introduced a new concept they call “network entrepreneurs.” As they put it, “Where social entrepreneurs often struggle to scale their own organizations despite heroic efforts, a network entrepreneur’s approach expands far beyond the boundaries of their own organization, supporting peers and partners across sectors to solve the problem. Not surprisingly, the potential for impact increases exponentially when leaders leverage resources of all types—leadership, money, talent—across organizations and sectors toward a common goal. And as a result of this work, we celebrate the change-generating network itself above any single person or institution.”

  8. I know I keep talking about how much I love the new History of Philanthropy blog, but this month was a perfect example of the tremendous value they bring the social change sector when Jeffrey Snyder explained how old and new philanthropy to support K-12 education differ. Fascinating. And it’s particularly interesting in light of Dale Russakoff’s new book that describes how Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s $100 million donation to Newark public schools in 2010 hasn’t accomplished a whole lot.

  9. And that wasn’t the only educational reform effort that came under fire in September. Samantha Allen of the Daily Beast chronicled a growing chorus of critiques of Teach for America.

  10. Philanthropic visionary Lucy Bernholz released a list of proposed changes to philanthropy policy that will keep up with changing times. As she put it: “It’s time to recognize that the tax code is no longer the fundamental policy frame shaping philanthropy and nonprofits…it should be obvious that tax privilege is only one factor that Americans consider when thinking about using their private resources for public benefit…The tax code was the 20th century policy infrastructure for philanthropy. Digital regulations will provide the scaffolding and shape for 21st century associations and expression — aka, civil society.”

Photo Credit: Evan Bench

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10 Great Social Innovation Reads: July & Aug 2015

social innovationSince I was out of the office for a good chunk of July and August, I’ve decided to combine both months into one 10 Great Reads list. But let me be clear, there was still lots going on, I just happened to be (somewhat blissfully) missing it.

From philanthropy’s role in inequality, to climate change preparation, to what the Greek financial crisis teaches us about networks, to civic engagement, to digital’s effect on fundraising, to social impact bond results and pizza on the family farm, they were a great couple of months.

In my (limited) view, below are my 10 favorite reads from the past two months. But because I know I missed things, please add to the list in the comments.

To see a longer list, follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or LinkedIn. And you can see past months’ 10 Great Reads lists here.

  1. President of the Ford Foundation Darren Walker made a lot of news this summer, from his announcement of Ford’s shift to focusing on inequality and unrestricted grants, to his July release of a thought-provoking essay in which he took foundations to task. He argued that foundations have been “cutting the pie into smaller slices,” and he instead encouraged funders to embrace “a new era of capacity building investment.” Because, as he put it, “What civil society needs most, and now more than ever, are resilient, durable, fortified institutions that can take on inequality, fight poverty, advance justice and promote dignity and democracy.” Amen! Ford’s move kicked off an excellent Inequality and Philanthropy forum on the HistPhil blog. And Inside Philanthropy‘s David Callahan argued that Walker’s message is about significant change, which may be tough for the sector to hear.

  2. In a fascinating (and rather depressing) article, Eric Holthaus from Slate talks to climate scientists about how they are personally responding to the climate crisis, particularly how they have “factored in humanity’s lack of progress on climate change in [their] families’ future plans.” Yikes.

  3. Reserve funds are an incredibly critical (but often misunderstood) aspect of nonprofit financial strategy. But as she always does, Kate Barr from the Nonprofits Assistance Fund provides a clear roadmap to understanding.

  4. Paul Vandeventer uses the summer’s Greek Euro crisis to illustrate when networks (of which the Eurozone is an excellent example) thrive and when they fail. As he puts it, “Ignoring or giving short shrift to…the fundamental principles by which networks operate wastes precious reserves of time, money, and goodwill, and imperils all the hopeful good that organizations, institutions, and countries set out to achieve when they start down the path of networked action.”

  5. Late July saw a fascinating gathering of social changemakers around civic engagement, the “Breaking Through” conference, hosted by the Knight Foundation. Keynoter Peter Levine argued “This is the year that we can take back American politics. It’s up to us.” It was a great lineup of speakers and sessions about getting people engaged again. You can see video from the conference here.

  6. Is digital becoming a gamechanger in fundraising? Some think so. And in August Facebook launched a new Donate button, but is it really all that helpful to nonprofits? Some argue that Facebook is critical. Others think the Donate button is a fail.

  7. August of 2014 saw the record-breaking ALS Ice Bucket fundraising challenge. Many (including me) were skeptical of the campaign, but it turns out that last summer’s financial windfall helped scientists make a breakthrough in research to fight the disease.

  8. This August was the 10 year anniversary of hurricane Katrina. There were many great articles about where New Orleans has been and is now. But my two favorite were Greater New Orleans Foundation President Albert Ruesga’s Ten-Year Perspective on the philanthropic response, and Andrea Gabor’s New York Times article, The Myth of the New Orleans School Makeover.

  9. The first results came in from the New York state social impact bond experiment, and they weren’t great. Goldman Sachs invested in a Rikers Island program that attempted to reduce recidivism among teenagers.The program failed to meet its goals and Goldman lost money. But New York is not giving up, as first Deputy Mayor Tony Shorris said, “This social impact bond allowed the city to test a notion that did not prove successful within the climate we inherited on Rikers.  We will continue to use innovative tools on Rikers and elsewhere.”

  10. I’m always a fan of examples of innovation. NPR provided a glimpse of how family farms are using pizza to reinvent their business model.

Photo Credit: Anne Adrian

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A Movement for Climate Solutions

After 90 days over 100 degrees, a complete lack of rain, and wildfires burning out of control, this summer in Texas has been a particularly bad one. Indeed, the weather around the globe increasingly proves that climate change is alive and well. Which is why this video is particularly inspiring. On September 24th people around the world took to the streets to demand action on climate change. Moving Planet inspired 2,000 events in 180 countries all bringing attention to the need for solutions. It was an inspiring thing to see.

If you’d like a little inspiration on a Friday, take a look.

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