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inspiration

What I Learned From My Time Off

I am back from vacation, and as I suspected it would, the space has given me a new lease on life. I have returned with more energy, more hope, more perspective, and less worry.

As I said before I left, I really encourage you also to take some time off this summer. Reject the pervasive notion that we must be always on and create some space for yourself to recharge.

Perhaps as an added incentive, I offer you some of the perspective that my time away gave me.

On my vacation I traveled to Europe, and I have to say, Europeans seem so much more relaxed than Americans. Now I spent only two weeks there, so this is far from a scientific observation, but the pace just seemed less harried. People walk more slowly than they do in America, taking more time with their strides, observing their surroundings, pausing to chat with friends. Meals take much longer and require that you specifically ask your waiter for the bill because they don’t want to rush you. The lack of a relentless pace allowed me to take a deep breath and live more in the moment. I’m trying to take that slower pace back to work with me.

Europeans also move their bodies and get outside much more than Americans, it seems. There are so many more bikes and pedestrians on the roads. In fact, in Berlin every street has a dedicated bike/pedestrian lane, and often one for each. And the biker or walker always has the right of way over the car. It is obvious that while cars are important, the healthier, more environmentally friendly forms of transportation are more valued. I found that the increased amount of walking and biking made me feel healthier, but also gave me a new perspective on my surroundings. Removing the separation of the car window, I became much more cognizant of and part of my world.

I also spent a lot of time exploring museums and monuments in order better to understand European history. Because we were in London and Berlin, our historical exploration tended to focus on World War II and the Cold War. And for some strange reason I found the people and places from that period of history strangely comforting. Our current times often feel overwhelmingly uncertain and grim. But those anxieties pale in comparison to the second half of the 20th Century, which was particularly hard on the people of Europe — from the rise of Nazism, to the violence and destruction of World War II, to the displacement and fear of the Cold War. Yet the European people somehow found a way to get through it. In fact, the DDR Museum, which chronicles social history in East Germany under communist rule, demonstrated how East Berliners, essentially cut off from the rest of the world by the Berlin Wall, found creative ways to build lives for themselves despite the limits of their surroundings. It was, to me, a testament to the human spirit’s ability to endure, adapt and survive. And it was a particularly heartening message for me in our 2017 world.

The geographic and historical space my time away provided helped me realize that my little world is fairly insignificant. There is a much larger world and a much longer history out there. And so I emerge more relaxed, more present and with a greater appreciation for focusing on what I can control and letting the rest just be.

Photo Credit: October 1961. Children keep their friendship across the barbed wire border between East and West Berlin. From the booklet “A City Torn Apart: Building of the Berlin Wall.” The Central Intelligence Agency.

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The Importance of Taking Time Off

hammockThere was a very disturbing report last week. An NPR poll found that half of Americans who work 50-plus hours a week don’t take all or most of the vacation they’ve earned. And among those who do take vacations, 30% say they do “a significant amount” of work while on vacation.

Ugh!

I cannot stress enough how important it is to the critical social change work we are all doing to take a break every once in awhile. And I mean really take a break and reconnect with those things that make us human, not machine. I don’t care what your job is and how critically important the work you do is, you will do it more effectively if you are a whole person. And you become and stay a whole person when you take time away from that job.

And because I believe in practicing what I preach, I’m about to take my own advice and disconnect from the world of social change (and social media) for the next few weeks. Instead I will be relaxing, playing with my kids, reading, hiking, and just being.

But in case you’ve already taken your time off (good for you!) and you want some things to read while I’m out, here are a few things to explore:

I’ll be back to writing the blog in mid-August. In the meantime, I hope you all find some space to breathe, to think, and to reconnect with what you are meant to do. Because believe me, we need you back in the Fall inspired and ready for the hard work ahead.

Photo Credit: Five Furlongs

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Don’t Cheat Us Of Your Contribution

DancesI’ve been thinking about creativity a lot lately. I don’t mean getting messy with paints and crayons, although that’s cool too.

Rather, I’ve been thinking about the idea (which was new to me until the last few years) that each one of us was put on earth to create something unique and important. Creativity is not just the assignment of famous writers, talented artists, even genius entrepreneurs and inventors.

Creativity is inherent in each one of us as human beings. And it is our obligation to tap into that creativity to do what we were put here to do. As (my hero) Steven Pressfield, author of The War of Art, wrote:

“If you were meant to cure cancer or write a symphony or crack cold fusion and you don’t do it, you not only hurt yourself, even destroy yourself. You hurt your children. You hurt me. You hurt the planet. You shame the angels who watch over you and you spite the Almighty, who created you and only you with your unique gifts, for the sole purpose of nudging the human race one millimeter farther along its path back to God. Creative work is not a selfish act or a bid for attention on the part of the actor. It’s a gift to the world and every being in it. Don’t cheat us of your contribution. Give us what you’ve got.”

Have you ever watched someone do something and felt that they were so incredibly suited to what they were doing that you were witnessing the work of an angel?

I know this sounds crazy, but I saw this with my son’s basketball coach recently. With two active boys I’ve seen lots of coaches in my time (some better than others). But I had never witnessed such complete grace and flow. Normally he’s just an average guy, but when this coach enters the basketball court you instantly can tell that he was put on this earth to inspire children to give the sport their all. His beautiful mix of tough love, endless support, helpful critiques, and raw passion for the sport turned a rag-tag team of kids who had never played before into a sight to behold.

And it makes you think, what if for some reason this coach had never become a coach? What if he, or some other force, got in his way? What would this world be like if he wasn’t allowed to be a coach? What would his life be like if he had to stifle his obvious gift?

But we do, all of us, sometimes (or perhaps a lot of times) get in our own way. We hinder ourselves from figuring out what our unique contribution is. When that happens we need inspiration to spur us to find our creative voice.

As Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic, explains, that when you are stuck:

“Find something to do — anything, even a different sort of creative work altogether — just to take your mind off your anxiety and pressure. Once, when I was struggling with a book, I signed up for a drawing class, just to open up some other kind of creative channel within my mind. I can’t draw very well, but that didn’t matter…I was fiddling with my own dials, trying to reach inspiration in any way possible…Einstein called this tactic ‘combinatory play’ — the act of opening up one mental channel by dabbling in another. This is why he would often play the violin when he was having difficulty solving a mathematical puzzle; after a few hours of sonatas, he could usually find the answer he needed.”

When I’m lost and can’t get back into my creative flow, I turn to another form of creativity to inspire me, sometimes art, sometimes writing, sometimes dance or music.

Something that has inspired my creativity lately is Walter Martin’s video for his song Down by the Singing Sea. His ethereal song paired with images of Russian ballroom dancers utterly in their own flow is completely captivating. It’s goofy and awkward and beautiful and thrilling all at the same time. For me, this is witnessing grace. So I listen and watch (and, yes, dance!) and their creativity spurs my creativity.

Maybe Walter will work for you as he does for me. Or maybe he won’t.

But you must find your creativity. Because when you are creating what you were put here to create, you are “nudging the human race one millimeter farther along its path back to God.”

So don’t cheat us of your contribution. Give us what you’ve got.

Photo Credit: Barry Goyette  

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Moving Past Darkness Into Light

This was a really hard week. The horror of the Boston Marathon and the explosion in West, Texas. I think we all feel horrified, vulnerable, shocked. But two things this week made me see the hope beyond the sometimes dark elements of life.

First was comedian and actor Patton Oswalt’s beautiful Facebook post about the ultimate goodness of humankind in the face of tragedies like the Boston Marathon. You should read the full post, but here is an excerpt:

Every once in awhile, the wiring of a tiny sliver of the species gets snarled and they’re pointed towards darkness.  But the vast majority stands against that darkness and, like white blood cells attacking a virus, they dilute and weaken and eventually wash away the evil doers and, more importantly, the damage they wreak…So when you spot violence, or bigotry, or intolerance or fear or just garden-variety misogyny, hatred or ignorance, just look it in the eye and think, “The good outnumber you, and we always will.”

And the second thing that gave me hope this week was this video from 12+, a nonprofit in Philadelphia that empowers students from under-served communities to pursue education beyond 12th grade (h/t @vppartners and @YearUp). It is incredibly inspiring. So if you need a little light after a dark week, take a look:

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A Friday Pep Talk

Here’s something a little different for your Friday. Kid President — the super cute and insightful Robbie Novak, a 9-year-old star of his own YouTube show — has become a phenomenon. President Obama has even taken notice. As I’m often reminded as a mother of young boys, it is an undeniable fact that those little voices can hold such profound insight.

So here’s a pep talk about changing the world from Kid President. I hope it inspires you on this Friday. Says Kid President, “You were made to be awesome. Let’s get out there!”

 

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