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nonprofit board

How You Can Learn to Stop Worrying and Love Your Board

Dr._Strangelove“Honestly, some days I think I would be so much better off without a board,” said an exasperated executive director to me recently.

Wrangling a group of volunteers who have competing and often conflicting interests is an exhausting job. It’s no wonder that nonprofit leaders often want to throw up their hands and soldier on without the rag tag group that’s supposed to further, as opposed to impede, the work.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. An “engaged board” is not an oxymoron. It is actually attainable. But you don’t get there by cajoling, guilting, ignoring or dismissing your board.

You get there by marshaling this critical army to grow your resources, your community of supporters, your results. Because an engaged board raises more money, recruits and trains other engaged board members, connects your nonprofit to key people and organizations necessary to achieve the mission, puts your nonprofit above their self interest, and ultimately leads your organization to greater results and impact.

There are very clear steps you can take to build an engaged board:

  • Create a clear idea of the specific skills, experience and networks board members should possess
  • Continually focus the board on the big picture
  • Get them ALL to raise enough money
  • Help them embrace money as an effective tool
  • Make them understand and be able to articulate the impact of your nonprofit
  • Create a commitment among them to build the organization
  • Encourage them to ask hard questions
  • And more…

You can help them become the board of directors they were meant to be.

An engaged board understands and fully embraces their charge. They have extremely high standards, and they hold themselves, their fellow board members and their nonprofit to those standards. They are constantly pushing, striving, and building the nonprofit to whom they are devoting their service. An engaged board may be an anomaly, but it doesn’t have to be.

Nonprofit BoardIf you want to build an engaged board, the Build an Engaged Board Tool Bundle can help you get there. The Bundle includes:

  • The “Getting Your Board to Raise More Money” Webinar
  • The “10 Traits of a Groundbreaking Board” E-book
  • The “How to Create a Groundbreaking Board” Webinar

Here’s what some people who have already downloaded the board tools had to say about them:

“This was very concrete and actionable – gave specific suggestions regarding engaging board members. This was very useful. Well done.”

“This really opened my eyes to new possibilities – thank you so much!”

“This was one of the best and most helpful and informative webinars I’ve been on. It was exactly what I was looking for in terms of beginning to get our board energized and on track and I will use the slides to help me prepare for our upcoming board retreat.”

An ineffective board is not just a frustration for the executive director. Sadly it is a HUGE missed opportunity. Your board could be so much more. When you effectively engage your board of directors, you grow your resources and ability to create social change exponentially.

You can download the Build an Engaged Board Tool Bundle here.

Photo Credit: Dr. Strangelove

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The Benefits of a Stronger Nonprofit Organization

helpI’ve written before about how hard it sometimes is for nonprofit leaders to ask for help. Donors, board members, regulators, and others put enormous pressure on nonprofit leaders to do it all with little (if any) help.

So in an effort to help nonprofit leaders convince those around them about the benefits of getting help, I’ve developed five benefit sheets describing the advantages of building a stronger nonprofit organization.

Whether or not you are interested in working with me, these benefit sheets describe the return on investing in nonprofit organization building efforts like leadership coaching, strategic planning, board engagement. Obviously I feel very strongly that nonprofits need to build stronger, more effective organizations, but that’s often a difficult case for nonprofit leaders to make.

I hope these benefit sheets can help you make that case:

Nonprofit Leader Coaching

Nonprofit Staff Coaching One-SheetNonprofit leaders have a Herculean list of tasks, and all of it  with little support along the way. It is easy to see why the position of nonprofit leader is such a lonely one.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. A leadership coach becomes your strategic partner helping you analyze your challenges and concerns, think through staffing decisions, overcome fundraising hurdles, address board management struggles, and brainstorm new approaches. Coaching provides tremendous benefits including: increased board and donor engagement, more productive staff, greater financial sustainability, and clearer strategic thinking. Download the Nonprofit Leader Coaching benefit sheet.

 

 

Strategic Planning

SV-strategic-planIn an increasingly competitive, resource-strapped world, great nonprofit strategy is less a luxury and increasingly a necessity. Without an overall strategy, a nonprofit is relegated to the world of “doing good work,” instead of the world of “making a real difference.” And these days more and more funders, supporters, advocates, partners and decision makers are requiring that nonprofits do more than just good work.

Smart nonprofit strategy can completely transform your nonprofit. It can create momentum, attract deeper funding, filter future decisions, become a management tool, and ultimately realize more social change. Download the Strategic Planning benefit sheet.

 

 

Board Engagement

SV-board-engagementIt can often seem impossible to get your board’s attention, let alone get them all pointing in the same, effective direction. But if managed strategically, your board can be an unstoppable army moving your nonprofit forward.

If you take a big step back and develop a groundbreaking board, you can dramatically increase your ability to: reach new audiences, grow your programs, forge new external partnerships, raise more money, increase exposure to key decision makers, build community investment and engagement. Download the Board Engagement benefit sheet.

 

 

Financial Model Assessment

SV-financial-assessIt happens all the time. A nonprofit leader wants to expand her services to meet growing demand, or is frustrated with a stalled fundraising effort, or doesn’t know where to diversify her fundraising efforts. She wants to raise more money, but doesn’t know how.

A Financial Model Assessment can be game changing. It uncovers how all aspects of your organization contribute to or detract from money flowing through your doors, including strategy, mission & vision, leadership, program delivery & impact, marketing and partnerships. It can give your nonprofit a deep understanding of where you need to focus your efforts and a clear road map for growing your financial sustainability. Download the Financial Model Assessment benefit sheet.
 

 

Financing Plan

SV-financing-planUnlike a traditional fundraising plan, a financing plan is an integrated, thoughtful, and strategic way to help your nonprofit raise enough money to achieve your programmatic and organizational goals. Instead of asking the question: “How much can we accomplish with what we can raise?” you start asking the question: “How much should we raise to accomplish our goals?”

A financing plan galvanizes board and staff to bring enough of the right kinds of money in the door to make your nonprofit’s goals a reality. It creates a sustainable financial model for your nonprofit so that you can survive and thrive. Download the Financing Plan benefit sheet.

 

 

If you are trying to make the case for a stronger nonprofit organization download these benefits sheets and share them with your board, donors, staff. And if you would like to talk about these organization building processes in more detail, let me know.

Photo Credit: Johnathan Nightingale

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7 Rules for Brilliant Nonprofit Leaders

CompassI came across a great article the other day, Rules for Brilliant Women, and as a female entrepreneur I found it really inspiring and affirming. But I realized nonprofit leaders need a similar list. Because just as women often sell themselves short, so too do nonprofit leaders. In fact, there are some interesting parallels between the place of women and the place of nonprofits in society, but that’s a post for another day.

So in the hopes of inspiring nonprofit leaders to claim their rightful place as true heralds of social change, here are 7 rules for brilliant nonprofit leaders:

  1. Find and Keep Your True North
    As a nonprofit leader you probably receive advice all day, every day. From board members, to donors, to staff members, to colleagues, to bloggers and consultants (ha!), everyone has an opinion about how you should do your job. So close your eyes, take a deep breath, and find your true north. Don’t do what you think you “should” do, or what someone else tells you to do. Follow what you know deep down is the right path.

  2. Remember the Dream
    The daily grind can wear a nonprofit leader to the bone. It is often an exhausting, thankless job. But you have to remember what got you here in the first place. And I bet that was some huge vision for how the world could be a very different place. Don’t lose sight of your overarching goal. And don’t lose heart that you may never get there. It’s the big honking dream that propels great leaders forward.

  3. Admit When You Don’t Know
    Leaders don’t have to know it all. And in fact the best leaders are those who recognize their weaknesses and figure out how to address them. The first step is openly admitting when you don’t know (to your board, your donors, your staff). Only then will you find the freedom and power to scale that wall.

  4. Ask for What You Really Need
    And once you freely admit what you lack, you must ask for it. Whether you need more staff, better technology, greater knowledge – demand it. Create a detailed list of what will make you more effective as a leader, put a price to those items, and then make the pitch to your board, to funders, to anyone who can help you get what you need.

  5. Don’t Wait for Permission
    How many times do nonprofit leaders wait for their board chair, or a big donor, or a government official to allow them to do something? True leaders find permission internally and then show those around them why their path was the right one. I get that there are times when forging ahead without consent would be politically unwise, but those times are less often than many nonprofit leaders think. Don’t shut yourself and your staff down because you fear making someone else mad.

  6. Stop Being So Nice
    The thing I love most about nonprofit leaders is that, for the most part, they are truly good, decent people. They are trying to make the world a better place, so by definition they are considerate of others. But sometimes you can take being nice too far. Being nice to the donor who leads your nonprofit the wrong way, or the staff member who can’t cut it may work for that individual relationship, but is detrimental to the larger organization and ultimately your mission.

  7. Hit Pause on Saving the World Once in Awhile
    I don’t care how fast-paced and “always on” our world becomes, we always need time and space to breathe, reflect, regenerate. Because you are in the business of improving lives, as a nonprofit leader you are particularly prone to the martyr syndrome of equating taking a break with fewer lives saved. But you will actually be more productive if you regularly focus on things outside the realm of saving the world.

Oh nonprofit leaders, I love you so. You are brilliant, beautiful human beings doing truly amazing things. Own it.

Photo Credit: Shyamal

 

 

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Financing Not Fundraising: Moving Beyond Nonprofit Startup Mode

staircaseI get a similar question a lot, “We really want to move our nonprofit out of startup mode but don’t know what the right first steps are.”

Although the definition of a “startup” is an organization that has been around for only a few years, there are many nonprofits that are still in startup mode despite their 20+ years of existence.

But the good news is that you don’t have to wait around for a knight in shining armor to save you from the endless startup existence, which is the topic of today’s installment in the ongoing Financing Not Fundraising series.

The power to begin scaling the startup wall is actually in your hands. Here are the steps to begin:

  1. Create Your Business Plan
    Probably a big part of the reason that you are still struggling as a startup (more than) several years in is that you haven’t strategically connected operations and financing to your mission. A business plan that answers questions like “How will you finance the business?” and “Who are your target customers (clients AND funders)?” and “What’s the right staffing structure?” and “What are the goals of the business?” and much more. Just because the profits from your business enterprise go back into the organization (nonprofit) instead of into the pockets of the owner or stakeholders (for-profit) doesn’t mean you don’t need a business plan. Figuring out how to align money, mission and operations is the first step to a stronger future.

  2. Grow Your List of Champions
    If your nonprofit’s inner circle consists of a founder and a few friends you will never grow. You have to convince people beyond those who already love you to internalize the work of the organization and become actively involved as board members, advisors, fundraisers. But you cannot target anyone and everyone. You have to identify people whose values connect with your work and your mission. And they have to have some specific skills, experience and networks that will help your organization move forward. But if you’ve only ever had your friends behind you, how do you convince outsiders to become champions and board members? Keep reading…

  3. Develop a Value Proposition
    If you are unable to articulate among internal board and staff what your nonprofit is hoping to accomplish and the value it provides the community, how can you possibly convince others to become involved? The first step in really taking things to the next level is to develop that value position, or a Theory of Change. A Theory of Change is basically an argument for why your nonprofit exists — how you take community resources (inputs) and create changes to program participants’ lives (outcomes). To move from merely getting by to really making strides, you must create this argument.

  4. Convince Others to Give
    Once you have your Theory of Change in place you need to make a compelling argument for how more inputs (funding) will help you create more outcomes. A case for investment is a logical, reasoned argument that helps you to make this case convincingly. Once completed, pieces of your case for investment can be used in fundraising appeals, on your website, in thank you letters, in marketing campaigns and much more. It is the fundamental building block to attracting more dollars to your nonprofit.

It doesn’t have to be a rule that the vast majority of nonprofits subsist in an endless startup mode. If you need some help finding your way out of startup mode, download the Nonprofit Startup Tool Bundle.

Photo Credit: Chad K

 

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How to Move Your Nonprofit Board from Fundraising to Financing

boardroomNote: I was asked to write a guest post for the Nonprofit About.com site about how to move a nonprofit’s board of directors from fundraising to financing. An excerpt of this blog post is below, and you can read the entire post on the Nonprofit About.com site here.

 

Nonprofit boards of directors are notoriously fundraising averse.

There are often countless excuses nonprofit staff and their board members give about why some board members should be excused from fundraising. Some of the most popular excuses include:

  • “We want client representation on our board, but our clients don’t have money.”
  • “Some board members aren’t good at fundraising.”
  • “We want board members with program expertise to focus on mission, not money.”
  • “Some board members are uncomfortable with asking for money.”

Fundraising is hard, I get it.

But it is absolutely critical that the entire board of a nonprofit understand how fundamental money is to the work — without it, nothing else matters. And you simply cannot understand something that you only observe from afar.

Which is why I strongly believe that every single board member should fully understand and contribute to how money flows to the organization. The board cannot argue that money is the purview of only the staff; money HAS to be part of the board’s job. Until the entire board really participates in making the financial engine run, they will be unable to have substantive conversations about how to raise or spend that money.

I know that this is a fairly controversial view, but perhaps it would be less controversial if we moved away from fundraising for nonprofits and worked to finance nonprofits instead. Just changing the terms can make a huge difference for a board.

We have to recognize that fundraising is a broken model. Most nonprofits chase low-return fundraising efforts that keep them from achieving financial sustainability. Instead nonprofits and their boards must together create and execute on an overall strategic financial model for the impact they want to achieve.

And in so doing, perhaps we will find that nonprofit boards become much more effective, willing, and confident contributors to financially sustainable nonprofits.

A financing approach that effectively involves the entire board looks like this…

You can continue reading the entire article on the About.com site here. And to learn more about moving your nonprofit board from fundraising to financing download the Financing Not Fundraising, vol. 3 e-book.

Photo Credit: ShellVacationsHospitality

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10 Most Popular Posts of 2013

UnderwoodKeyboardAs 2013 comes to a close, and we all head off for some much deserved rest and relaxation, I wanted to thank all of you wonderful Social Velocity readers. You are an inspiring group of people working tirelessly to make this world a better place. I am very thankful to be able to work and interact with you all through the Social Velocity blog.

Before I take a break from the blog until January, I want to provide a list of the ten most popular Social Velocity blog posts from this year in case you missed some of them. You can also read the 10 Most Popular Posts lists from 2011 and 2012.

I wish you all a peaceful and relaxing holiday season. I look forward to talking and working with you in 2014. Happy Holidays!

The 10 most popular Social Velocity blog posts of 2013 were:

  1. 5 Nonprofit Trends to Watch in 2014
  2. 5 Taboos Nonprofits Must Get Over
  3. Why Your Board Should Raise 10% of Your Nonprofit’s Budget
  4. 5 Reasons Your Nonprofit Isn’t Raising Enough Money
  5. Addressing the Nonprofit Fundraising Elephant in the Room
  6. Find and Keep a Great Fundraiser
  7. 5 Questions to Get Your Board Moving
  8. Getting Real About Nonprofit Overhead Costs
  9. NextGen Donors and the New Golden Age of Philanthropy
  10. The Nonprofit Sector Needs to Get Over the Fear Thing

And if you want to make sure not to miss a single post in 2014, sign up for the Social Velocity e-newsletter (and download a complimentary copy of the Financing Not Fundraising, vol. 1 e-book in the process).

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

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The Gentle Art of Nonprofit Board Herding

Nonprofit board fundraisingThere is such a hunger in the nonprofit sector for help wrangling the board of directors. Because the board is a disparate group of volunteers, it can often seem impossible to get their attention, let alone get them all pointing in the same, effective direction. This is even more true in fundraising. But if you can get your board members all on the same page, it can transform your nonprofit.

So as we approach the end of the year and the height of nonprofit fundraising I wanted to offer some ways you can get your board more involved, not just for the next couple of weeks, but for years to come.

Here are some strategies to get your board fundraising for your nonprofit:

Start a Game-Changing Board Discussion
One way to plant the seed of change is to engage the board in a thought-provoking discussion. If you’re interested in kicking one off at your next board meeting, ask your board a question like:

And if you are uncomfortable starting the discussion yourself, let me do it. Share my video Why Every Board Member Should Fundraise at the meeting and see how board members respond. Be prepared for some disagreement, perhaps even anger and frustration. But I believe it’s far better to get the demons on the table so you can examine them rather than pretending they just don’t exist.

Give the Board Options
If you have board members that are scared of fundraising, or that hate to ask people for money, there are plenty of other things they can do to help. I believe there is an endless list of ways board members can contribute to the financial engine of the organization, from writing a business plan, to negotiating with a vendor, to hosting a friend raiser, and the list goes on. If you want to help your board think outside the fundraising box, these lists (here and here) of ways board members can raise money (without fundraising) can help.

Educate the Board on Fundraising
Often a board’s inertia comes from a lack of knowledge. Very few people know how to fundraise effectively. So remove that barrier by educating your board about how money flows in the nonprofit sector, how other boards raise money, how to ask for money, etc. The Getting Your Board to Raise Money webinar, the Finding Individual Donors webinar, and the 10 Traits of a Groundbreaking Board e-book can all be useful tools to help your board understand how things work and how they can be more helpful to the financial sustainability of the nonprofit they serve.

Involve the Board in Making the Case
You can’t expect the board to raise money if they can’t make a compelling argument for why people should give. And you can’t just hand board members a brochure and expect them to effectively articulate the message. If you really want to get your board excited about raising money for your cause, involve them in making a case for investment. Bring them together as a group to ask and answer a series of questions about why people should give to your nonprofit, what your organization is working towards, why it matters, and so on. The Draft a Case for Investment Step-by-Step Guide will give you the framework to use. At the end of the exercise you will have not only a compelling case to make to prospective donors, but, more importantly, an army of board members excited about making that case.

It is an unfortunate reality that almost every nonprofit leader faces. Boards of directors, as a rule, are not effective fundraisers. But you can move beyond that by getting your board to talk, think and act differently about bringing money in the door.

And if you’d like some one-on-one help to get your board raising more money, check out the board engagement consulting and nonprofit leader coaching services I provide.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

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New Tools to Build Your Nonprofit

Build an Engaged Nonprofit BoardA couple of years ago I recognized that there was a real need in the nonprofit sector for tools to help nonprofit staffs, board members and donors make their organizations more strategic and sustainable.

So I began developing e-books, guides and webinars to explain new concepts (like Financing Not Fundraising), demonstrate how to use new models (like a theory of change) and guide nonprofit leaders to a better way (like better engaging their board).

Today, I am really excited to announce, as promised, the launch of the expanded and streamlined Tools store at Social Velocity.

I have spent the last several months revising and expanding many of the e-books, step-by-step guides and on-demand webinars available for download at the Social Velocity Tools page. And we’ve completely revamped the shopping cart experience to make it easier to find the tools you need and to offer additional payment options.

There are four categories of Tools available to you.

  1. On-Demand Webinars
    These can be viewed whenever and however many times you’d like. Some of the webinar topics include:

    How to Build a Groundbreaking Board
    Getting Your Board to Raise Money
    Finding Individual Donors

  2. Step-by-Step Guides
    These take a complex concept (like a theory of change) and show you step-by-step how to create one for your organization and how to use it to garner more support, chart a strategic direction, and much more. Some of the Step-by-Step Guides include:

    Design a Theory of Change
    Craft a Case for Investment
    Build a Nonprofit Financing Plan

  3. E-books
    These explain new approaches, the theory behind them, and how to start implementing a changed approach in your nonprofit. Like the:

    Financing Not Fundraising, vol 1
    Financing Not Fundraising, vol 2
    Ten Traits of a Groundbreaking Board

  4. Tool Bundles
    I’m most excited about these bundles where I’ve grouped e-books, webinars and guides around a particular goal a nonprofit leader wants to achieve, saving you 15% off the individual tool prices. For example:

    Attract More Donors Bundle
    Build an Engaged Board Bundle
    Raise Capacity Capital Bundle

But there are many more e-books, guides, webinars, and bundles available on the Tools page, so I invite you to check it out.

I hope these Tools are helpful to you as you work to move your nonprofit forward. Please let me know if you have questions as you explore.

And as always, please let me know what other tools would be helpful to you.

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